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Nature, mental health, and equity. Highlights from the kick-off meeting of the GreenME project

The GreenME project will study how exposure to nature can be integrated in healthcare systems to treat and improve mental health for all.

It officially launched its ambitious initiative at the Kick-off meeting held in Barcelona from January 29th to 31st, 2024. Hosted by the Open University of Catalunya (UOC) and
coordinated by the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), the event brought together over 60 consortium members, including the esteemed Advisory Board members, the European Commission’s
project officer Patrizia Tenerelli, and researchers from sister projects (RESONATE and NATURELAB).

During this three-day event, participants had the opportunity to get to know each other and the passion that drives them, while visualising the unique contributions they will make to the project over the next
four years.

Researchers, therapy providers, and municipalities representatives worked together to address the challenges of the project via an insightful collective hands-on exercise, listing burning questions and
providing answers leading to a half-day exchange to identify ways forward. In between sessions, the participants recharged their minds and bodies with walks in nearby parks, mindfulness exercises, and a mandala-making outdoor activity, concretely experiencing how nature benefits mental health. Fun activities engaged the lively consortium; participants were asked to find clever solutions to build Kapla structures using just one finger or to tell their stories through a photographic language exercise!

This Kick-off meeting saw the robust collaboration and exchange of ideas with sister projects RESONATE and NatureLAB, operating under the overarching theme of mental health, nature, and sustainability. The anticipated collaboration is poised to drive forward pioneering research and foster transformative outcomes within the realm of nature-health interactions. Moreover, the Research Synergies workshop held during the Kick-off meeting facilitated dynamic exchanges with researchers from other scientific projects, including BlueHealth, GoGreenRoutes, Dr. FOREST, and PHENOTYPE. By fostering interdisciplinary collaboration, GreenME aims to accelerate progress towards building just resilient and sustainable healthy communities.

A core tenet of the GreenME initiative is the empowerment of green care actors and stakeholders. Recognizing the pivotal role of community involvement in shaping sustainable healthcare solutions, GreenME is committed to actively engaging with and empowering stakeholders throughout the project lifecycle. By fostering partnerships and amplifying the voices of green care advocates, GreenME seeks to cultivate a more inclusive and impactful approach to mental health and well-being. As GreenME embarks on this transformative journey, the consortium is poised to drive forward cutting-edge research, innovation, and collaboration to advance the understanding and integration of nature-based interventions in mental healthcare.

The GreenME Consortium:

In a trans-disciplinary partnership, GreenME involves six European countries, together with the UK
and theUS. GreenME is led by the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB – Barcelona, Spain) and
the GreenME consortium is composed of:

  1. University of Bologna (Bologna, Italy),
  2. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet - Uppsala, Sweden),
  3. ILS Research (Research Institute for Regional and Urban Development - Dortmund, Germany),
  4. Warsaw University of Life Sciences (SGGW – Warsaw, Poland),
  5. Open University of Barcelona (UOC – Barcelona, Spain),
  6. Old-Continent (Brussels, Belgium),
  7. NeuroLandscape Foundation (Warsaw, Poland),
  8. Gesellschaft für Gartenbau und Therapie (GGuT – Hückeswagen, Germany),
  9. Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology (IPIN – Warsaw, Poland),
  10. Scandinavian Nature and Forest Therapy Institute & SHINRIN-YOKU (Stockholm, Sweden),
  11. Eta Beta Cooperativa Sociale (Bologna, Italy),
  12. City of Herne (Herne,Germany),
  13. Spanish Association of Horticulture and Social and TherapeuticGardening (AEHJST – Madrid, Spain),
  14. University of Kent (Kent, UK),
  15. University of Salford (Salford, UK),
  16. Social Farms and Gardens (Bristol, UK) and
  17. Mind in Bexley and East Kent LTD (London, UK),
  18. The US partner is Oregon Health & Science University Portland State University School of Public Health (OHSU-PSU — Portland, Oregon).

The project will last 4 years and is funded by the Horizon Europe research and innovation programme of the European Union.

For more information about GreenME and its initiatives, please visit https://greenme-project.eu
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CLM field session in Singapore – How to recognize Contemplative Landscape features in the park

On 6.10.2023 upon the National Parks Board (NParks Singapore) request, Dr Agnieszka Olszewska-Guizzo conducted the onsite consultation and training for the NParks designers and officers regarding the use of the Contemplative Landscape Model (CLM). NParks is currently rolling out the CLM in their parks and actively using this evidence-based tool [read more here].

We’re hoping to mainstream this research and apply it to a lot more sites outside of our parks and gardens… So far, we’re still in the early stage of hand-holding, but we hope it becomes adopted and grows in the wider industry”, says Jason Wright, Director of Design at NParks.

During the session Dr Guizzo shared the practical considerations of the use of the tool in the evaluation of the newly implemented"Wellness Garden"  - a part of East Coast Park in Singapore.  Additionally, she has answered the doubts and addressed the considerations of NParks landscape architects team about the active use of the CLM.

This was a very fruitful exchange session where all issues could be discussed in confrontation with the actual site!

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Urban Solutions and Sustainability R&D Congress 2023, Singapore

Date: 4 - 5 October (Wed & Thu), 2023

Venue: Sands Expo and Convention Centre

 

The Congress was divided into several breakout sessions, out of which this specific one dedicated to mental health and well-being promotion through contact with urban nature. Below are the descriptions of speakers and talks. Among them our own Dr Agnieszka Olszewska-Guizzo. More details can be found at the Congress website.

Liveability: Nature and Well-being

This session brought together various speakers from the public sector and research spheres, to highlight leading areas of research and application in advancing nature-based solutions for health and well-being, as part of Singapore’s overall transformative efforts under its “City in Nature” vision.

Prof Tan Puay Yok
Chief Science & Technology Officer and Director, Singapore Botanic Gardens
National Parks Board (NParks)
Professor, College of Design and Engineering
National University of Singapore (NUS)

Topic: The Salubrity of Urban Nature: From Patterns to Mechanisms

There is probably a universal acceptance that nature in cities provides numerous benefits for urban dwellers. Among these, the health benefits from urban nature is a recurring and long-standing theme across different disciplines, from landscape architecture to urban planning, to human geography and public health planning. This is reflected in the increasing number of scholarly articles on this topic published over the last two decades. Such a recognition of the salubrious benefits of nature that cuts across cultures, however, can be said to be a rediscovery of old knowledge. For instance, more than two thousand years ago, Hippocrates said “Nature itself is the best physician”.

In Chinese culture, the idea of “天人合一” promotes the practice of harmony between human and nature as a way of living and an ethical treatment of the environment. Therefore, given the long cultural associations and increasing scientific evidence, what else needs to be done to increase the health benefits of nature exposure? One such area is to undertake studies that go beyond documenting benefits of nature exposure, to understanding the mechanisms leading to health benefits. Understanding mechanisms, in turn, provide the necessary evidence to design optimal interventions that address constraints of space, time and lifestyles of urban living. This presentation shares perspectives on the need to invest more efforts to develop a better mechanistic understanding of the health-promoting effects of nature exposure.

Dr Lin Shengwei Ervine
Senior Lecturer
Programme Director Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, Department of Architecture
National University of Singapore (NUS)

Topic: Measuring Urban Landscapes for Assessment of Restorative Potential

Exposure to nature is widely suggested to provide multiple benefits, including the capacity to trigger mental restoration. This makes it essential to integrate natural elements into urban landscapes through purpose-built parks or neighbourhood greening efforts. Singapore is no stranger to this and has spent decades greening the city into its current state. However, it is unclear what kind of greenery typologies should be prioritized in relation to the urban environment, and how the two interact and affect restorative potential. This talk will showcase two novel methods for measuring urban landscapes specific to assessing and predicting the restorative potential of neighbourhood landscapes.In doing so, it will shed light on preliminary research findings which point towards the importance and complexities of attempting to measure such an elusive effect. Such findings pave the way for fresh insights into planning and designing urban landscapes in order to maximise restorative benefits to urban dwellers.

Dr Agnieszka Olszewska-Guizzo
President & Co-founder
NeuroLandscape

with

Ms Alicia Soh,
Senior Manager, Development Management
National Parks Board (NParks)

Topic: Urban Nature for Mentally-Healthy Cities: Contemplative Landscapes
This talk will provide new insights for integrating natural landscapes into cities with consideration of better mental health and well-being, by delving into the concept of "Contemplative Landscapes" along with its supporting scientific background. Evidence from local and international studies on the influence of contemplative landscapes on the brain will also be discussed, together with the practical implications of how urban planners and residents can harness this concept to maximize the therapeutic benefits of nature. Finally, the talk will also address current and future approaches regarding the application of the Contemplative Landscape Model.
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NeuroLandscape a part of GreenME – the Horizon EU Funded Project!

NeuroLandscape is delighted to announce its participation in the consortium selected for the prestigious Horizon Europe GreenME project  with a budget of nearly 6M euro.

This collaboration presents an exciting opportunity to advance our mission of integrating nature-based solutions into urban environments for enhanced well-being and sustainable living. Led by Universita Autonoma de Barcelona, the GreenME consortium aims to revolutionize greencare and urban planning practices across Europe. NeuroLandscape's involvement in this groundbreaking initiative will commence on September 1st, 2023, as we eagerly anticipate the positive impact we can collectively make on the health and well-being of urban dwellers.

 

GreenME stands for "Advancing GReenCare in Europe: an integrated multi-scalar approach for the Expansion of Nature-based therapies to improve Mental health Equity" 

This project is an ambitious endeavor that seeks to advance greencare practices across Europe through an integrated, multi-scalar approach. It has received significant recognition and funding through the prestigious Horizon Europe program. This collaborative project brings together leading researchers, policymakers, and practitioners in the field of nature-based solutions to address pressing urban challenges and create healthier, more sustainable cities.

NeuroLandscape's Involvement in the Consortium

NeuroLandscape's inclusion in the GreenME consortium is a testament to our expertise and commitment to promoting the benefits of nature in urban environments. As a key partner in the consortium, NeuroLandscape will contribute valuable insights and practical experience gained from our extensive research in the quality of urban greening and mental health promotion through the nature connection. Our participation aims to leverage wide international network of contacts, insights from evidence-based design, environmental psychology, and the impact of nature on human health and well-being to support the project's success.

Through collaboration with partners across Europe, NeuroLandscape will actively contribute to the development of innovative approaches and solutions that integrate nature into urban settings. Our goal is to foster positive impacts on mental health, physical well-being, and social cohesion through evidence-based design and strategic implementation of nature-based interventions.

The GreenME Project's Objectives

The GreenME project encompasses a broad range of objectives, each focusing on different aspects of greencare implementation at various scales. By fostering interdisciplinary collaboration and knowledge exchange, the project aims to:

  1. Investigate the benefits of nature-based interventions on human health and well-being.
  2. Develop evidence-based design guidelines for creating nature-rich urban environments.
  3. Enhance the role of urban green spaces in mitigating climate change and promoting sustainability.
  4. Establish a European-wide network to facilitate the exchange of best practices and expertise.
  5. Provide policymakers with comprehensive recommendations for integrating greencare strategies into urban planning frameworks.

Expected Outcomes and Impact

Through the GreenME project, NeuroLandscape and its consortium partners strive to achieve transformative outcomes that will positively impact cities and their inhabitants across Europe. By implementing nature-based solutions and greencare strategies, we envision:

  1. Improved mental and physical health outcomes for urban dwellers.
  2. Enhanced ecological resilience and biodiversity in urban environments.
  3. Increased social cohesion and community engagement through nature-based interventions.
  4. Strengthened policy frameworks that prioritize the integration of nature in urban planning for mental health and well-being.
  5. Sustainable urban development that prioritizes the well-being of both people and the planet.

NeuroLandscape's participation in the GreenME project represents an exciting opportunity to contribute to the advancement of greencare practices in Europe. By four years long collaboration with leading experts, policymakers, and practitioners, we aim to integrate evidence-based research and practical knowledge to create nature-rich urban environments that promote well-being and sustainability.

With the project set to begin on September 1st, 2023, we are poised to embark on this transformative journey. We are confident that the GreenME project will have a profound and lasting impact on the way we approach urban planning and the integration of nature in day-to-day urban living.

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“Neuroscience for Designing Green Spaces: Contemplative Landscapes” – A Revolutionary Book

Experience the power of "Neuroscience for Designing Green Spaces: Contemplative Landscapes" - a revolutionary book by Dr. Agnieszka Olszewska-Guizzo. This comprehensive guide was released on May 30, 2023. It revolutionizes landscape design through an innovative approach rooted in neuroscience.

 

Unveiling Contemplative Landscape Design

Delve into the concept of Contemplative Landscape Design, meticulously crafted over a decade of research. Driven by neuroscience principles, this book serves as a go-to resource for landscape architects and architects seeking to effortlessly integrate mental health and well-being into their practice.

This is the first time where I put together the knowldege acumulated thoughout the years.  This book contains all the nuances about design for mental health and well-being. So that landscape architects and architects can easily access and use for their practice.  Before I published only peer-reviewed articles focused mostly on the mental health implications and the performed neuroscience experinents. But I am a landscape architect first, so I come back to my original field with and I hope it will be a useful tool for anyone interested in designing or benefitting from contact with natural landscapes! - says the author.

Accessing the Book

Discover "Neuroscience for Designing Green Spaces: Contemplative Landscapes" available in paperback, hardcover, and e-book formats. You can easily purchase your copy through the Taylor & Francis website or Amazon, ensuring convenient access to this groundbreaking publication.

The book cover of a new book "Neuroscience for Designing Green Spaces: Contemplative Landscapes" It featues a silhouette of a person looking at the beautiful landscape view with a shape of a city on a horizon. There are tall old trees and sunshine shining through them. There are also chairs and a table behind a person standing on a grassy ground

ABSTRACT

Urban parks and gardens are where people go to reconnect with nature and destress. But do they all provide the same benefits or are some better than others? What specific attributes set some green spaces apart? Can we objectively measure their impact on mental health and well-being? If so, how do we use this evidence to guide the design of mentally healthy cities?

The Contemplative Landscape Model unveils the path to answer these questions. Rooted in landscape architecture and neuroscience, this innovative concept is described for the first time in an extended format, offering a deep dive into contemplative design and the science behind it. In the face of the global mental health crisis, and increasing disconnection from nature, design strategies for creating healthier urban environments are what our cities so sorely need.

This book delves into the neuroscience behind contemplative landscapes, their key spatial characteristics, and practical applications of the Contemplative Landscape Model through case studies from around the world. Landscape architects, urban planners, students, land managers, and anyone interested in unlocking the healing power of landscapes will find inspiration here.

"Neuroscience for Designing Green Spaces: Contemplative Landscapes" - a revolutionary book

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What A.I. says about Contemplative Landscape Model?

It is fascinating how artificial intelligence can provide us with a third-person's view of our field of expertise. It is like having another expert summarising our work from an objective standpoint, making it more approachable for anybody. We recently asked ChatGPT about the Contemplative Landscape Model and its usability for professionals and how its benefits can be leveraged. Here is the Q&A with the A.I.!

What can the Contemplative Landscape Model do?

The Contemplative Landscape Model, developed by Dr. Olszewska-Guizzo, is a research-based framework that aims to identify the landscape scenes that have the highest potential to induce positive mental health outcomes from passive exposure to them. The model does not focus on identifying mental health benefits from nature exposure per se, but instead, it identifies design elements that can enhance the quality of the outdoor environment and promote human well-being.

The model's primary focus is on identifying specific design elements in the landscape that can create contemplative experiences and promote positive mental health outcomes. These elements include features such as water, vegetation, and other natural elements that can elicit a sense of calm and tranquility in the viewer. The model proposes that by incorporating these elements into the design of public spaces, designers can create environments that promote positive mental health outcomes and enhance the quality of life of users.

The Contemplative Landscape Model has practical applications in a variety of settings, from healthcare and educational facilities to urban parks and residential neighborhoods. By using the model to guide their design choices, landscape architects and urban designers can create environments that are not only visually appealing but also promote positive mental health outcomes.

Overall, the Contemplative Landscape Model offers a valuable tool for landscape architects and urban designers to create outdoor environments that promote human well-being and foster contemplative experiences.

What are the seven key elements of the Contemplative Landscape Model?

The seven key elements of the Contemplative Landscape Model are as follows:

  1. Layers of the Landscape: This refers to the different layers of the landscape, from the ground level to the sky, and how they interact to create a sense of depth and connection to the environment.
  2. Landform: The contours and shape of the land are used to create a sense of enclosure and openness, as well as to guide the flow of movement and energy.
  3. Biodiversity: Incorporating a diverse range of plant and animal life can help to create a sense of connection to nature and promote ecological health.
  4. Color and Light: The use of color and light can help to create a specific mood or atmosphere within the space, such as calmness or energy.
  5. Compatibility: The design should be compatible with the surrounding context, including the architectural style and cultural context.
  6. Archetypal Elements: The archetypal elements in the Contemplative Landscape Model are typically considered to be water, earth, air, and vegetation (e.g. forest, meadow, etc.). These elements are often used to create a connection to the natural world and evoke a sense of archetypal meaning and symbolism within the space.
  7. Character of Peace and Silence: The overall design should promote a sense of peace and silence, allowing visitors to relax and reflect.

What is the most important contemplative landscape element?

It is difficult to say that any one element of the Contemplative Landscape Model is the most important, as they all work together to create a space that promotes relaxation, reduces stress, and promotes positive mental health outcomes. However, some researchers have suggested that the use of natural elements such as water and vegetation may be particularly important in creating a restorative environment.

Research has shown that exposure to natural environments with these elements can help to reduce stress, improve cognitive function, and promote positive mood states. Additionally, the use of natural elements can create a sense of connection to the natural world, which can also promote well-being.

That being said, each of the seven elements in the Contemplative Landscape Model - Layers of the Landscape, Landform, Biodiversity, Color and light, Compatibility, Archetypal Elements and Character of Peace and Silence - plays an important role in creating a space that is restorative and promotes positive mental health outcomes.

...but the desert does not have any vegetation and is contemplative...

You are correct that a desert landscape may not have traditional forms of vegetation, but it can still be contemplative and have elements that promote positive mental health outcomes.

For example, a desert landscape may have unique landforms and patterns in the sand that can create a sense of awe and wonder. The play of light and shadow in the desert can also be captivating and calming, especially during sunrise or sunset. The stillness and quiet of a desert environment can also create a sense of peace and serenity.

The Contemplative Landscape Model recognizes that each landscape is unique and that different elements may be important in different contexts. While natural elements such as vegetation are often important in creating restorative environments, other elements such as landforms, light, and silence can also play an important role.

...moreover, the desert is a powerful archetype. The experience of being alone in the desert's harsh landscape is considered an existential experience.

You are correct that the desert can be a powerful archetype and evoke a variety of existential experiences.

The archetype of the desert can represent both harshness and isolation, as well as the potential for renewal and transformation. The vast and barren landscape can evoke feelings of solitude, self-reflection, and introspection, while also representing the potential for spiritual growth and renewal.

As such, the contemplative experience of being alone in the desert's harsh landscape can be considered an existential experience. The vastness of the landscape can make one feel small and insignificant but also connected to something greater than oneself. This sense of awe and wonder can promote a sense of mindfulness and presence, which can in turn promote positive mental health outcomes.

Where in the world Contemplative Landscape Model can be the most useful?

The Contemplative Landscape Model can be useful in many different parts of the world where there is a need to create outdoor environments that promote human well-being and foster contemplative experiences.

In particular, the model can be most useful in urban areas where people may have limited access to natural environments. Studies have shown that exposure to nature can have a positive impact on mental health and well-being, but many urban environments lack access to green spaces or natural scenery. By incorporating elements of the natural environment into urban design, such as green roofs, public parks, or street trees, the Contemplative Landscape Model can help to enhance the quality of the built environment and promote positive mental health outcomes.

The model may also be particularly useful in areas with high levels of stress or trauma, such as healthcare facilities or areas affected by natural disasters. By creating outdoor spaces that are designed to promote contemplative experiences and enhance the sense of calm, the Contemplative Landscape Model can help to improve the mental health and well-being of people in these high-stress environments.

Overall, the Contemplative Landscape Model can be useful in many different parts of the world, especially in urban environments and high-stress environments where there is a need to promote positive mental health outcomes and enhance the quality of life of users.

Can the Contemplative Landscape Model be used in developing countries?

Yes, the Contemplative Landscape Model can be used in developing countries. In fact, it may be especially relevant in these countries, where urbanization and rapid development are often accompanied by a loss of natural landscapes and green spaces.

In many developing countries, the lack of access to green spaces and exposure to nature can contribute to poor mental health outcomes. By incorporating elements of nature into urban design, the Contemplative Landscape Model can help to create environments that promote positive mental health outcomes, even in highly urbanized areas.

Furthermore, the Contemplative Landscape Model is designed to be adaptable to different cultural contexts and geographic regions. It is based on a universal understanding of human responses to different types of landscapes, rather than on specific cultural or regional factors. This means that the model can be applied in many different countries and contexts, including developing countries.

Overall, the Contemplative Landscape Model can be a valuable tool in promoting positive mental health outcomes and enhancing the quality of life in developing countries. By incorporating elements of nature into urban design, the model can help to create healthier, more sustainable, and more livable cities in these countries.

Which social and economic groups can benefit the most from contemplative landscapes?

Contemplative landscapes can provide numerous benefits to a wide range of social and economic groups. However, certain groups may benefit more than others.

One group that may benefit greatly from contemplative landscapes is those living in urban areas, especially those who lack access to green spaces and natural environments. This can include low-income communities, as they often have less access to parks and other outdoor recreational spaces. Contemplative landscapes can provide these communities with a way to connect with nature, reduce stress, and improve overall mental health and well-being.

Additionally, contemplative landscapes can be beneficial for individuals who experience high levels of stress, such as healthcare workers, caregivers, and those in high-pressure jobs. These individuals may benefit from access to outdoor spaces that are designed to promote relaxation and contemplation, which can help to reduce stress and improve mental health.

Finally, contemplative landscapes can be beneficial for individuals who are recovering from trauma or experiencing mental health issues. Exposure to nature has been shown to have a positive impact on mental health and well-being, and contemplative landscapes can provide a space for individuals to relax, reflect, and heal.

Overall, while contemplative landscapes can benefit many different social and economic groups, those who may benefit the most include those living in urban areas with limited access to green spaces, individuals experiencing high levels of stress, and those recovering from trauma or experiencing mental health issues.

How costly it is to implement contemplative landscapes in the city or a neighborhood?

The cost of implementing contemplative landscapes into a city or neighborhood can vary depending on a range of factors, such as the size of the area, the existing infrastructure, the desired design elements, and the level of community involvement. However, in general, incorporating contemplative landscapes into urban design does not necessarily have to be an expensive undertaking.

One simple way to create contemplative landscapes is by opening up views to distant natural scenes. Another key-principles of contemplative landscape design is the use of natural materials and low-impact design elements, which can help to keep costs down. For example, incorporating existing vegetation, such as trees and shrubs, can provide numerous benefits without the need for costly landscaping. Additionally, incorporating low-cost design elements, such as benches, walkways, and water features, can help to create a contemplative atmosphere without breaking the bank.

Furthermore, community involvement can be a crucial factor in keeping costs down. By involving community members in the design process and encouraging volunteerism in the construction and maintenance of the space, costs can be significantly reduced. This can also help to build a sense of community ownership and investment in the space, leading to long-term sustainability.

Overall, while there may be some costs associated with implementing contemplative landscapes into a city or neighborhood, the use of natural materials and low-impact design elements, as well as community involvement, can help to keep costs down and make the project more feasible for a wider range of communities.

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Presentation at the International Conference for Environment and Human Health | HK

18 of August 2022
10:40 AM Hong Kong Time (GMT+8)
*online

Dr Agnieszka Olszewska-Guizzo to present "Neuroscience for Designing Urban Green Spaces: Contemplative Landscape Exposure for Mental Health"

at the  International Conference for Environment and Human Health hosted by Research Centre for Environment and Human Health in Hong Kong.

floriade

Floriade Challenge 🌿‘The Green Escape’

Floriade Challenge 🌿‘The Green Escape’🌿 took place at Aeres Hogeschool Almere and Floriade Expo 2022.

25 young professionals accepted the challenge of  and the Gemeente Almere to develop an innovative concept for greening an important 🏃🏻 slow-traffic route 🚴🏻 in the centre of Almere.

May 20th:

Location:            Floriade

MASTERCLASS: 14.45-16.00 u

14.15-14.45        IT check

14.30-14.45       Online walk-in

14.45-14.47       Welcome & practicalities

14.47-14.55       A few questions to check in + get invested in the lecture topic

14.55-15.15       Lecture Dr Dinand Ekkel: "Urban Green Development: Why?"

15.15-15.25       Q&A

15.25-15.45       Lecture Dr Agnieszka Olszewska-Guizzo : "Neuroscience-Based Design for Mentally-Healthy, Green Cities"

15.45-16.00      Q&A + roundoff plenary part

16.00-16.15        End of plenary part & break

 To read more about the presentations, have a look here

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1st in-person NeuroLandscape Workshop | Korthi-Greece | 7-9 May 2022

Natural and Cultural Heritage for Healthier and More Sustainable Urban Realms

The first, in-person scientific meeting of NeuroLandscape Team, titled "Natural and Cultural Heritage for Healthier and More Sustainable Urban Realms" took place among beautiful landscapes of the Greek island of Andros, hosted at the local Korthi Town Hall. 

The program of a 3-day event included:

SATURDAY (7.05.2022)

Time Presentation title - Speaker (Affiliation) Language
11:15 - 11:30 Welcome & Opening with Coffee GR/ENG
11:30 - 12:00 Contemplative Landscapes for Sustainable Tourism -  Dr. Agnieszka Olszewska-Guizzo (NeuroLandscape) ENG
12:00 - 12:30 Nature-Based Solutions for More Inclusive and Resilient Communities - Dr. Weronika Gasior (NeuroLandscape) ENG
12:30 - 13:00 A.I. Tools for Cultural Heritage and Tourism - Dr. Theofrastos Mantadelis (NeuroLandscape) ENG

SUNDAY (8.05.2022)

10:00 - 10:30 Impact in Post-pandemic Times: Neuroscience to the Rescue - Dr. Nicolas Escoffier (NeuroLandscape) ENG
10:30 - 11:15 Gender Equality Plan as a necessary tool for Horizon Europe Applications - Dr. Weronika Gasior (NeuroLandscape) ENG
11:15 - 11:30 Coffee Break
11:30 - 12:00 Korthian Artists 1850-1950 - Mr. Aristeidis Mantadelis (Civil Engineer) GR/ENG
12:00 - 13:00 Can you  see what you’re looking at?: Contemplative Landscape Features Recognition and Assessment - outdoor workshop - Dr. Agnieszka Olszewska-Guizzo (NeuroLandscape) ENG

MONDAY (9.05.2022)

10:00 - 10:30 Dimetra - Predicting vulnerable goods disease before transportation - Dr. Theofrastos Mantadelis (NeuroLandscape) ENG
10:30 - 11:15 Sustainable food systems in the EU legal framework - Ms. Aleksandra Zaborowska (Neurolandscape and EP) ENG
11:15 - 11:30 Coffee Break
11:30 - 12:00 Climate Change and Water Management - case study of Khulna, Bangladesh - Ms. Nazwa Tahsin (NeuroLandscape) ENG
12:00 - 12:30 VinhoLandscape - An Introduction to the Wines of Northern Portugal - Mr. Raul J.Guizzo (Symington Family Estates) ENG
12:30 - 13:00 Wine Tasting - workshop - Mr. Raul J.Guizzo (Symington Family Estates) ENG